How artificial intelligence is re-discovering lost Quinkan rock art in remote Cape York

How artificial intelligence is re-discovering lost Quinkan rock art in remote Cape York

Another trip to Quinkan Country followed, which kick-started so-called technology tours, in which experts in a range of different technologies from AI to GIS mapping, drones, solar and wind power test the latest innovations.

However, it was only when they were granted $1.2 million under a program run by the Queensland Government, Advance Queensland and The Defence CRC for Trusted Autonomous Systems, that the undertaking hit high speed.

The program was looking for a Queensland-based project that could be applied to defence, in which autonomous systems were being tried and tested for assurance in accuracy, scalability and reliability.

General Manager of KJR, Andrew Hammond, said the Western Yalanji venture was the perfect fit.

“On foot if you know where a site is, it can take a five-hour return trip so it’s not very scalable,” Andrew said.

“With machine learning and AI, we know the characteristics of where good rock art should be, so we use AI to look at the geology of the area to determine where they might be and then use the drones to get into those sites.

“We’re looking for overhangs and fresh water and it’s more like a half hour trip.

“If we think it’s worth more investigation, we go in on foot.

“The end goal is to do this in an automated manner where we program the drones to go out and collect the data and then we document it.

“It’s not only about finding new sites but protecting and preserving the current sites – checking on them in an automated manner.”

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